Exercise is not panacea


Dr. Blair says,  it’s much easier to eat 1,000 calories than to burn off 1,000 calories with exercise. As he relates, “An old football coach used to say, ‘I have all my assistants running five miles a day, but they eat 10 miles a day.’” It is all the three:exercise,diet and lifestyle.
Exercise has long been touted as the panacea for everything. For better health, simply walk for 20 or 30 minutes a day, boosters say — and you don’t even have to do it all at once. Count a few minutes here and a few there, and just add them up. Or wear a pedometer and keep track of your steps. However you manage it, you will lose weight, get your blood pressure under control and reduce your risk of osteoporosisBut it is not so simple:

No doubt  exercise has great  benefits, but  its powers have been oversold. Sure, it can be fun. It can make you feel energized. And it may lift your mood. But before you turn to a fitness program as the solution to your particular health or weight concern, consider what 

science has found. Some the benefits are simply indirectly.
Moderate exercise, such as walking, can reduce the risk of diabetes in obese and sedentary people whose blood sugar is starting to rise. That outcome was shown in a  study in which participants performed  an exercise and diet program, to take a diabetes drug or to serve as controls. 
Despite trying hard, those who dieted and worked out lost very little weight. But they did manage to maintain a regular walking program, and fewer of them went on to develop diabetes.

Exercise also may reduce the risk of heart disease. Sedentary  people when become  moderately active:usually by walking regularly and  intense exercise had better blood pressure readings.
The problem of  evaluating exercise and cancer is not simple. The same sort of studies that were done for heart disease find that people who exercised had lower rates of colon and breast cancer. But whether that is this result is cause or effect is not well established ?
Exercise is often said to stave off osteoporosis.  Walking, running or lifting weights has not been shown to have that effect. Exercisers are less likely to fall  because they got stronger or developed better balance. Since falls can lead to fractures in people with osteoporosis, exercise may prevent broken bones But only indirectly.And what about weight loss? Lifting weights builds muscles but will not make you burn more calories. The muscle you gain is minuscule compared with the total amount of skeletal muscle in the body. 
Exercise alone, in the absence of weight loss, has not been shown to reduce blood pressure. Nor does it make much difference in cholesterol levels. Weight loss can lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, but if you want to lose weight, you have to diet as well as exercise. Exercise alone has not been shown to bring sustained weight loss.

Summary: Exercise is not panacea, recent research studies show. There are some indirect results.





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